DNS Administration Book Reviews

DNS Administration Book Reviews

Featured DNS Administration:

DNS on Windows Server 2003

While computers and other devices identify each other on networks or the Internet by using unique addresses made up of numbers, humans rely on the Domain Name System (DNS), the distributed database that allows us to identify machines by name. DNS does the work of translating domain names into numerical IP addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and many other services, so that users require little or no knowledge of the system. If you’re a network or system administrator, however, configuring, implementing, and maintaining DNS zones can be a formidable challenge. And now, with Windows Server 2003, an understanding of the workings of DNS is even more critical. DNS on Windows Server 20003 is a special Windows-oriented edition of the classic DNS and BIND, newly updated to document the many changes to DNS, large and small, found in Windows Server 2003. Veteran O’Reilly authors, Cricket Liu, Matt Larson, and Robbie Allen explain the whole system in terms of the new Windows Server 2003, from starting and stopping a DNS service to establishing an organization’s namespace in the global hierarchy. Besides covering general issues like installing, setting up, and maintaining the server, DNS on Windows Server 2003 tackles the many issues specific to the new Windows environment, including the use of the dnscmd program to manage the Microsoft DNS Server from the command line and development using the WMI DNS provider to manage the name server programmatically. The book also documents new features of the Microsoft DNS Server in Windows Server 2003, including conditional forwarding and zone storage in Active Directory (AD) application partitions. DNS on Windows Server 2003 provides grounding in: Security issues System tuning

Rating: (out of 10 reviews)

List Price: $ 49.99
Price: $ 41.34

DNS on Windows Server 2003 Reviews

Review by :

This book is well-written and very easy to read. It covers all the basics of DNS and the specifics around Windows Server 2003 DNS. The AD chapter is a gem!I have to disagree with reviewer “Santhosh Sivarajan”. Just as with the base OS, there weren’t huge differences with DNS between 2000 and 2003, but I think this book did a good job in covering the differences. All the major enhancements including conditional forwarding and stub zones were covered in detail. Also, contrary to what Santhosh said, application partitions are covered in depth in the AD chapter.In short, if you are running Windows Server 2003 DNS, you won’t go wrong with this book.

Review by Cisco Kid Redux:

As in-depth as you will get on DNS for Windows 2003. A recent reviewer stated that it’s much of the same. Well, much of it really is; and if you”ve been working with DNS for as long as many of us, nothing about its operations should be new to you. The most significant “tweaks” in DNS in the past few years have been done by Microsoft, to support their AD/200x line – those features are detailed quite specifically in this book (it’s what this is all about anyway). And with AD continually evolving, chapters such as Managing DNS Programmatically (with WMI completely in mind) should be of utmost importance for the practicing MS administrator (that is, if you’ve really read the book!)

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Linux Dns Server Administration (Craig Hunt Linux Library)

Written specifically for Linux administrators, this text is a complete, advanced guide to all things DNS as it pertains to Linux. Contains hundreds of clear, consistent examples, and shows how to master the features of BIND 8, and offers a look at the upcoming BIND 9. Instruction on a plethora of advanced tasks. Softcover. Linux, which is well suited to fire-and-forget applications that require high reliability, can make an excellent foundation on which to build a Domain Name System (DNS) server. Linux DNS Server Administration shows how to do that, treating Linux generically (the book sticks to features of the 2.x kernel that are common to all distributions) and showing how to configure Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND) on top of that base. The result is a technical document that’s focused, detailed, and oriented toward the practical considerations–such as security–of real-world system administration. Because providing DNS service isn’t as much a matter of administration as of proper initial setup, Linux DNS Server Administration spends about half the time describing what a DNS server does and explaining how to get BIND service going. It mainly steers clear of “do-this, do-that” instructions, favoring statements of problems and their solutions (with lots of configuration file listings), instead. A similar approach later shows how to plug known security holes, configure logging, and optimize performance. For more information on DNS and BIND, check out the classic DNS and BIND. Although it’s not focused specifically on Linux, that’s the definitive work on name resolution under Unix generically. –David Wall Topics covered: Domain Name System (DNS)

Rating: (out of 5 reviews)

List Price: $ 39.99
Price: $ 32.50

Linux Dns Server Administration (Craig Hunt Linux Library) Reviews

Review by John P. Hoke:

If you can only buy one book for running BIND on Linux, this is your book. Craig Hunt walks you through configuring DNS for many straight-forward, day to day configurations, as well as some quite esoteric setups and needs. The coverage of security and BIND is quite good, with ample explanations of the security issues of running a DNS server, ways to stop the “common” hacks of BIND, and options to look into for greater security (DNSSec, dedicated DNS server, keysigning, etc). The book’s organization lends itself to reading cover to cover, picking up more details and better understanding as you go, while skipping areas that may or may not be germain to your particular situation (BIND 9, DNSSec etc).This series of books from Sybex is turning out to be one of the best for Linux Administrators, the other titles (that I own) cover SAMBA and Apache, and are just as well written and compotent. While their are other books on BIND out there (such as DNS & BIND by O’Reilly) this one is the most approachable, and without sacrificing techinical details of an often misunderstood topic.

Review by Sean Nel:

After strugling for two weeks trying to figure out Linux Server setups (specifically DNS) I got this book. This was the third book I bought (the other two just confused me more) and I wish I bought it first. It is clear and concise with good examples. It is readable and not just DBA-jargon and for once someone understood that if you are going to buy a book on how to set up a DNS, It means that you most probably are not familiar with all the little hidden details that needs to be remembered along the lines. I would suggest this book to everyone, from the first-timers (newbies?) to the more proficient webmaster looking for some more internet security!All I can say is “It’s a great book!”

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Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration

Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration is a complete guide to setting up and running a TCP/IP network on Windows NT. Windows NT and TCP/IP have long had a close association, and this is the first book to focus exclusively on NT networking with TCP/IP. It starts with the fundamentals–what the protocols do and how they work, how addresses and routing move data through the network, and how to set up your network connection. Beyond that, all the important networking services provided as part of Windows NT– including IIS, RRAS, DNS, WINS, and DHCP–are presented in detail. This book is the NT administrator’s indispensable guide.The world runs on IP addresses and the transmission of data between them, and Windows NT controls an increasing number of TCP/IP networks. Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration helps demystify the aspects of Windows NT that relate to TCP/IP. Craig Hunt wrote the standard book on TCP/IP under Unix–TCP/IP Network Administration–and he and Robert Thompson have applied their skills with equal aplomb to Windows NT 4. The authors don’t assume too much here–they explain how IP addressing and TCP sessions work in general before diving into the specifics of TCP/IP under Windows NT. Readers learn the essentials of packets, addresses, routing, name resolution, subnets, and sockets before Hunt and Thompson trundle out a single Windows NT screen shot. Windows NT coverage is comprehensive and authoritative. Beginning with a walkthrough of TCP/IP installation under the operating system, Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration proceeds to reveal the details of all services that relate to TCP/IP. The book includes coverage of Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Windows Internet Name Service (WINS), Domain Name Service (DNS), Routing and

Rating: (out of 13 reviews)

List Price: $ 37.95
Price: $ 0.04

Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration Reviews

Review by :

There are so many NT TCP books available that I decided to head for the mall and check them out at the B&N. I sat on the floor for most of the afternoon reading this and several competing titles, comparing coverage and checking several things that I already knew something about. This book was by far the best of the bunch. It’s comprehensive, clearly written, full of useful information and tips, and completely devoid of fluff. In other words, a typical O’Reilly book. Buy this one. You won’t regret it.

Review by K. G. Schneider:

If I could buy only five books to help me run my network, Windows Nt Tcp/Ip Network Administration would be near the top of that list. (Another would be Minasi’s Mastering NT Server 4.) The advice is detailed and practical, the writing is down-to-earth, and it’s obvious that the authors are deeply familiar with the protocols and applications they are writing about. I start with this book first when I have a TCP-IP question–even before TechNet, because Hunt and Thompson give you the real skinny, not the “company” answer. Also–and this is rare for technical titles–this book is carefully-edited and a pleasure to read.

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BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book

The BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book is a convenient resource covering the tools and configurations for the ISC BIND 9 DNS software suite. BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) is the most commonly-used DNS server on the Internet. BIND provides the named DNS server, a resolver library, and various tools for operating and verifying the DNS server and configurations. The BIND 9 implementation includes DNSSEC for signed zones, TSIG for signed DNS requests, IPv6 support, incremental zone transfers (IXFR), dynamic DNS, zone change notifications, EDNS0, multiple views, multi- processor support, and more. This printed book is based on a variety of open source documentation included with the BIND source code, including the definitive references for the configuration syntax and grammar and the usage of the BIND programs. New chapters and content were added, including many examples and detailed indexing and cross-referencing. This BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book corresponds to BIND 9.5 and also covers some differences between older versions.

Rating: (out of 1 reviews)

List Price: $ 20.90
Price: $ 18.81

BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book Reviews

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Microsoft Windows 2000 DNS: Implementation and Administration

This book focuses on the implementation and interoperability of Windows 2000 DNS with other current DNS architectures. Most DNS implementations are UNIX-based (BIND) and MS administrators will need to acquire stronger knowledge in this area. This book will focus on integration and less about Microsoft positioning (i.e. the shortcomings of different DNS models and how Microsoft tries to be “cutting edge”.)

List Price: $ 49.99
Price: $ 3.87

TCP/IP Network Administration (3rd Edition; O’Reilly Networking)

This complete guide to setting up and running a TCP/IP network is essential for network administrators, and invaluable for users of home systems that access the Internet. The book starts with the fundamentals — what protocols do and how they work, how addresses and routing are used, how to set up your network connection — then covers advanced routing protocols, and provides tutorials on configuring important network services. This third edition includes ways of configuring Samba to provide file and print sharing on networks that integrate Unix and Windows, and tackles the important task of configuring the Apache web server. Network security coverage now includes details on OpenSSH, stunnel, gpg, iptables, and the access control mechanism in xinetd. Plus, the book offers updated information about DNS, including details on BIND 8 and BIND 9, the role of classless IP addressing and network prefixes, and the changing role of registrars is inlcuded. This hands-on book is a must-have for all network administrators.This book will be indispensable to Unix system administrators. It describes how to set up and administer a network of Unix systems using the TCP/IP protocols, taking a thoroughly practical approach. Topics covered include basic system configuration, routing, common network applications, and many others.

Rating: (out of 31 reviews)

List Price: $ 44.95
Price: $ 33.99

TCP/IP Network Administration (3rd Edition; O’Reilly Networking) Reviews

Review by :

Firstable, I would like to state that if you plan to use this book on Windows-based network, you better think it over. Although TCP/IP concept applies to any network that complies to TCP/IP (like Windows and UNIX), this book is better be used on UNIX-based network. If you use Windows for your network, I think you better get the author’s Windows version: “Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration”.For command examples in this book, author used Linux and Sun Solaris. But this book should apply on any UNIX operating system (including HP-UX, BSD, Mac OS X, and AIX). There might be a little command adjustment needed for specific UNIX operating system, which should be not causing trouble at all.As said by other reviewers, this book explains a complete aspects of what any UNIX system administration should concern about. Even if you are only an end user; this book I think is also important to you, especially when the system administrator is not available.The book gives a comprehensive idea of TCP/IP system. It starts on TCP/IP overview, IP addressing, IP routing (routing table and ARP), DNS, server configuration, and file and print server (chapter 1, 2, and 3). Chapter 4 to 5 concerns on how UNIX operating system configure the network.Chapter 6 to 9 are the next step on configuration. They prepare you how to make every network component internetwork to each other. Chapter 10 to 12 are overview on more advanced topics. Finally, chapter 13 presents you how to get more info on TCP/IP specification.I would like to point out that this book assumes some conditions. The author expected that the audiances have a fair knowledge of TCP/IP. If you think that you have a little or no prior knowledge, I suggest that you read the following books on TCP/IP. You should first read “Internetworking with TCP/IP Vol. 1: Principles, Protocols, and Architectures” by Douglas Comer, “TCP/IP Addressing” by Buck Graham, and “IP Addressing and Subnetting” by J.D. Wegner.If you are a more advanced reader who needs to know more about certain topics, here are my suggestion. For those who need to take a closer look on ARP frames and packets, you should read “TCP/IP Illustrated Vol. 1: The Protocols” by Richard Stevens. Need more troubleshooting tips? Read “Network Analysis and Troubleshooting” J. Scott Haugdahl. Prefer on network security? Have “Building Internet Firewalls” by Elizabeth Zwicky and “Intrusion Signatures and Analysis” by Mark Cooper.As a network administration, I personally love this book. Together with “UNIX System Administration Handbook” by Evi Nemeth and “UNIX Powertools” by Jerry Peek; they make a sufficient reference for any UNIX system administrators and end users, especially if you are new to the subjects. The coverages are step by step and thorough. You should have no worries using or administrating UNIX network with this book and all other I mentioned before.

Review by Richard Bejtlich:

I am responsible for a 50+ person intrusion detection mission, and I read this book in February 2000 to supplement my knowledge of TCP/IP. Like other great technical books, this volume manages to educate the reader on subjects related to TCP/IP, while still covering the main material thoroughly. (I place Rod Smith’s “Multi-Boot Configuration Handbook in this category as well.) This is the type of book that tempts you to highlight chunks of text on every page. Keep in mind the audience is a system administrator, so theory is supplemented by suggested best practices and configuration options. I’m looking forward to an updated version of the Windows version of TCP/IP Network Administration — any publication dates available, Craig?

Buy TCP/IP Network Administration (3rd Edition; O’Reilly Networking) now for only $ 33.99!

Automating System Administration with Perl

If you do systems administration work of any kind, you have to deal with the growing complexity of your environment and increasing demands on your time. Automating System Administration with Perl, Second Edition, not only offers you the right tools for your job, but also suggests the best way to approach specific problems and to securely automate recurring tasks.Updated and expanded to cover the latest operating systems, technologies, and Perl modules, this edition of the “Otter Book” will help you:Manage user accountsMonitor filesystems and processesWork with configuration files in important formats such as XML and YAMLAdminister databases, including MySQL, MS-SQL, and Oracle with DBIWork with directory services like LDAP and Active DirectoryScript email protocols and spam controlEffectively create, handle, and analyze log filesAdminister network name and configuration services, including NIS, DNS and DHCPMaintain, monitor, and map network services, using technologies and tools such as SNMP, nmap, libpcap, GraphViz and RRDtoolImprove filesystem, process, and network securityThis edition includes additional appendixes to get you up to speed on technologies such as XML/XPath, LDAP, SNMP, and SQL. With this book in hand and Perl in your toolbox, you can do more with less — fewer resources, less effort, and far less hassle.

Rating: (out of 8 reviews)

List Price: $ 31.99
Price:

Automating System Administration with Perl Reviews

Review by W. D. Freeman:

Perl occupies the sweet spot between shell scripting and C programming, with the ability to lean as far as you’d like in either direction. As a sysadmin, Perl is better than a tool — its the perfect tool for building tools, and this book is at the top of a very short list of texts which help bring to bear the full power of the best language for cutting down complex tasks down to size.

I’ve read a lot of Perl books and I own most of the O’Reilly books on the topic. The Otter Book, however, is the one which I cart around with me in my laptop bag wherever I go and is the first place I look for hints on how to attack problems that I face at work or home. It’s chocked full of working examples and hints and tips on how to customize them, as well as plenty of context as to why these suggestions work the way they do.

The book is very well written and I highly recommend it to anyone, whether they are a professional admin or just want to cut out some of the repetitive tasks of managing their own workstation.

Review by Tobias Oetiker:

On times I think that having books on Unix or current computing topics in general is an oddity at best. Isn’t all the information we need readily available via Google, some blogs and for Perl CPAN? But then again as I was reviewing the second installment of Davids Otter book I found my self quite often amazed at all the little gotchas and tricks David added in. There are so many tools available today that this book severs as an invaluable guide through the jungle of possibilities in doing efficient System Administration. David does not praise a single solution to all problems. He rather gives detailed advice on succeeding in various scenarios. Yes the book is also about doing sysadmining with perl, but it comes natural and is in no way a language advocacy piece on the finer points of perl programming. It is both wide and deep by providing detailed examples in actual working code. I can highly recommend this book for both seasoned as well aspiring master craftsmen.

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DNS in Action: A detailed and practical guide to DNS implementation, configuration, and administration

A detailed and practical guide to DNS implementation, configuration, and administration Technically detailed with practical solutions Comprehensive guide to configuration and administration of DNS servers Covers DNS Extensions, delegation, and registration In Detail The Domain Name System is one of the foundations of the internet. It is the system that allows the translation of human-readable domain names into machines-readable IP addresses and the reverse translation of IP addresses into domain names. This book describes the basic DNS protocol and its extensions; DNS delegation and registration, including for reverse domains; using DNS servers in networks that are not connected to the internet; and using DNS servers on firewall machines. Many detailed examples are used throughout the book to show perform various configuration and administration tasks. What you will learn from this book? This book covers all the basic as well as advanced uses of DNS:

Chapter 1 introduces basic DNS concepts, such as domains and subdomains, domain naming syntax, reverse domains, zones, queries, resolvers, name servers, forwarder servers.

Chapter 2 explains the DNS protocol, focusing on DNS query. The chapter makes use of several examples of DNS client-server communication. Including an example of a non-existent RR query and its answer, communication with a root server, and TCP and UDP DNS queries.

Chapter 3 describes extension to the DNS protocol, including DNS Update, DNS Notify, Incremental Zone Transfer, Negative caching, DNS IPv6 Extension, DNSsec, and TSIG.

Chapter 4 discusses name server implementations, focusing on Bind, versions 4, 8, and 9. The use and configuration of the program named is explained in detail. The chapter also discusses the Windows 2000 implementation.

Chapter 5 covers DNS tuning and administration and tools, such as named-checkconf, named-checkzone, nslookup, dnswalk,

Rating: (out of 2 reviews)

List Price: $ 29.99
Price: $ 26.99

DNS in Action: A detailed and practical guide to DNS implementation, configuration, and administration Reviews

Review by Geoffrey Sisson:

According to the title page of this book, it is an English translation

of a Czech book (ISBN 80-722-6675-6) published in 2003, apparently from

a manuscript completed in 2001 (based on the dates used in the

examples).

The content has not been appreciably updated, if it’s been updated at

all. For example, in Section 3.5.1 and 3.5.2, the book discusses AAAA

and A6 resource records, noting “The use of the AAAA record will not

prevail in the future, though”. However, the IETF moved the A6 record

to EXPERIMENTAL status in 2001 (!), effectively deprecating it in favor

of AAAA. In fact, the book is dangerously out-of-date, as it has an

extensive treatment of BIND 4 without anywhere noting that the

ISC — the maintainer of BIND — deprecated BIND 4 in 1997. (BIND 4 is

now widely regarded as unsafe for use in a production environment.)

The woefully dated content isn’t the only problem. The translation

from Czech is sloppy, with many typographical errors and awkward

sentences. There are many artifacts from what was presumably initially

a machine translation. There are also quite a few minor inaccuracies,

and negligible coverage of security issues (other than a section on an

obsoleted version DNSSEC).

In short, I cannot warn strongly enough against this book. It’s

inadequate, even as a primer. I would recommend one of these

immeasurably better books on DNS for anyone at any level

seeking to learn more about DNS:

– Pro DNS and BIND, by Ron Aitchison

(ISBN 1590594940)

– DNS and BIND (5th Edition), by Cricket Liu and Paul Albitz

(ISBN 0596100574)

Buy DNS in Action: A detailed and practical guide to DNS implementation, configuration, and administration now for only $ 26.99!

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DNS And BIND Book Reviews

DNS And BIND Book Reviews

Featured DNS and BIND:

DNS and BIND (5th Edition)

DNS and BIND tells you everything you need to work with one of the Internet’s fundamental building blocks: the distributed host information database that’s responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and even listing phone numbers with the new ENUM standard. This book brings you up-to-date with the latest changes in this crucial service. The fifth edition covers BIND 9.3.2, the most recent release of the BIND 9 series, as well as BIND 8.4.7. BIND 9.3.2 contains further improvements in security and IPv6 support, and important new features such as internationalized domain names, ENUM (electronic numbering), and SPF (the Sender Policy Framework). Whether you’re an administrator involved with DNS on a daily basis or a user who wants to be more informed about the Internet and how it works, you’ll find that this book is essential reading. Topics include: What DNS does, how it works, and when you need to use it How to find your own place in the Internet’s namespace Setting up name servers Using MX records to route mail Configuring hosts to use DNS name servers Subdividing domains (parenting) Securing your name server: restricting who can query your server, preventing unauthorized zone transfers, avoiding bogus servers, etc. The DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) and Transaction Signatures (TSIG) Mapping one name to several servers for load sharing Dynamic updates, asynchronous notification of change to a zone, and incremental zone transfers Troubleshooting: using nslookup and dig, reading debugging output, common problems DNS programming using the resolver library and Perl’s Net::DNS moduleThe Domain Naming System (DNS) is a glorious thing. It takes familiar Internet network and machine names (like “amazon.com”) and converts them to Internet Protocol (IP) addresses (like “208.35.218.15”) that are meaningful to routers and therefore useful for identifying the machine you want

Rating: (out of 64 reviews)

List Price: $ 49.99
Price: $ 24.49

DNS and BIND (5th Edition) Reviews

Review by :

I’m the DNS administrator at a mid-size Internet Service Provider, and because we are an ISP, a lot of our day-to-day operations rely on the proper implementation of DNS. After all, as I found out today, we do primary DNS for approximately 1800 domains (yikes). The combination of everyday experience with DNS and the wealth of information – both theoretical and practical – that I got from this book has done so much for my understanding of DNS and of the Internet as a whole. The book begins with the basics of building a nameserver, but I know that if I have a specific question, I can use it as a reference book as well. It’s also written in a straightforward, accessible manner. The only constructive criticism I can offer is that I wish it had more information about managing many domains (not just subdomains). That’s still not enough to lower my overall rating to four starts from five. If you have to get one book on DNS, get this one – it will more than suffice. I look forward to the next edition covering BIND 8.x. Excellent job, O’Reilly, Paul Albitz, and Cricket Liu!

Review by Jon R. Kibler:

Changing from a pre-8 version of BIND to version 8 of BIND is not as straightforward as previous upgrades have been. Then `named.boot’ file is entirely different, among other changes. This book is great at identifying the required changes and assisting in making those changes.DNS and BIND clarifies all the mysteries associated with BIND (named) and DNS. Easy to read. Covers every detail from getting and installing the latest BIND, to configuration and troubleshooting. Has a great chapter on nslookup and another that gives detailed explanations of just about every BIND related error message. The only thing they left out is info on configuring syslog to manipulate in a usable manner the BIND generated messages.For some reason, DNS seems to be a mystery to so many sysadmins. If it were as simple as people often pretend it is (typical system admin person: “Oh, I already know everything about DNS that I need to know… so why read a book or take a course?”), then why do I see 15,000+ lame server messages and 250+ mail CNAME messages every month? These errors are only the result of DNS configuration errors!Very few sysadmin people REALLY know as much about BIND and DNS as they should. If you are a sysadmin person, do yourself a favor and buy and read this book. If you are an IT manager, check your system administrator’s book shelf. If this book is missing, then buy it for them and make them read it! (You should read it first, then develop some test questions to see if they really did read it!)This BOOK MUST BE REQUIRED READING for EVERY system administrator on any type of system connected to the Internet. If everyone that administered an Internet site read this book, we could probably reduce the error traffic on the Internet by 50% or more!This book also should be the basis of a required one-quarter undergraduate CS course at all schools that teach CS, CE, IT, or equivalent.One of the best written of the O’Reilly books.Jon R. Kibler, Systems Architect, Advanced Systems Engineering Technology, Inc.

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The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND

The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND provides you with the technical depth and expert-level information you need to understand and administer DNS and BIND. Domain Name System (DNS) is a distributed Internet directory service. It is used mainly to translate between domain names and IP addresses, and to control Internet email delivery. Most Internet services rely on DNS to work, and if DNS fails, Web sites cannot be located and email delivery stalls. BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Daemon) is an implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols. This book covers setting up a DNS server and client, DNS domain zones, compiling and configuring BIND, dial-up connections, adding more domains, setting up root servers on private networks, firewall rules, Dynamic DNS (DDNS), subdomains and delegation, caching and name resolution, troubleshooting tools and techniques, debugging and logging, new features in BIND 8.2.2, and it offers introductory information on BIND 9.

Rating: (out of 6 reviews)

List Price: $ 34.99
Price: $ 12.79

The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND Reviews

Review by Ingvar Hagelund:

I found this book concice and clear, and much easier to understand than the classic “DNS and BIND” from O’Reilley. Specially, I found the fast steps onto a working DNS server clear and right to the point. I also enjoyed get a working secure dynamic DNS setup over a insecure network. Humor between the lines makes the book a good read. I’ll have this book in my front bookshelf for a long time. It’s great, both as a howto and for reference. Getting the BIND manpage printed on paper is a nice bonus as well. Mr. Langfeldt, you rule!Ingvar

Review by :

I liked this book. It covers interesting and relevant fields (DDNS, security concerns, how to interface with DNS from different languages, …) in addition to the basics, in enough depth to be really useful. It is practical and down-to-earth, with thorough examples, explaining how things work and why. It definitely helped me grok the ideas and concepts behind DNS.

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DNS & BIND Cookbook

The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. This title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, “How do I get BIND?” to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. With the wide range of recipes in this book, you’ll be able to Check whether a name is registeredRegister your domain name and name serversCreate zone files for your domainsProtect your name server from abuseSet up back-up mail servers and virtual email addressesDelegate subdomains and check delegationUse incremental transferSecure zone transfersRestrict which queries a server will answerUpgrade to BIND 9 from earlier versionPerform logging and troubleshootingUse IPv6 and much more.

Rating: (out of 7 reviews)

List Price: $ 34.95
Price: $ 34.94

DNS & BIND Cookbook Reviews

Review by :

This book has turned out to be the best investment I’ve made so far in my 20 year IT career. I’ve always trusted O’Reilly books for their detailed accuracy. However, for the task at hand, I didn’t need a book to explain WHY things work… I needed one to tell me how to GET them to work. This book was perfect! It doesn’t replace the DNS and BIND, 4th Edition, but is a great compliment… Actually, I’m finding the 4th Edition a perfect compliment to the Cookbook.

Review by Andrew P. Kaplan:

Like the BIND book, the DNS and BIND cookbook is an invaluable reference for any DNS/Email/Web admin. This book answers many of the questions raised in the BIND book through numerous illuminating illustrations. It explains the differences between BIND 4, 8 and 9. Plus there’s a great section on email and even IPv6The DNS & BIND cook book coupled with the BIND book are truly the BIND bibles.

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Pro DNS and BIND

Pro DNS and BIND guides you through the challenging array of features surrounding DNS, with a special focus on BIND, the world’s most popular DNS implementation. This book unravels the mysteries of DNS, offering insight into origins, evolution, and key concepts like domain names and zone files. This book focuses on running DNS systems based on BIND 9.3.0—the first stable release that includes support for the latest DNSSEC (DNSSEC.bis) standards and a major functional upgrade from previous BIND 9 releases. If you administer a DNS system or are thinking about running one, or if you need to upgrade to support IPv6 DNS, need to secure a DNS for zone transfer, dynamic update, or other reasons, or if you need to implement DNSSEC, or simply want to understand the DNS system, then this book provides you with a single point of reference. Pro DNS and BIND starts with simple concepts, then moves on to full security-aware DNSSEC configurations. Various features, parameters, and resource records are described and, in the majority of cases, illustrated with one or more examples. The book contains a complete reference to zone files, Resource Records, and BIND’s configuration file parameters. You can treat the book as as a simple paint-by-numbers guide to everything from a simple caching DNS, to the most complex secure DNS (DNSSEC) implementation. Background information is still included for when you need to know what to do and why you have to do it, and so that you can modify processes to meet your unique needs. Topics Include: Introduction to the DNS Basic DNS types with complete configuarion examples DNS and IPv6 Installing BIND on Linux, FreeBSD and Windows Subdomain delegation DNS and load balancing

Rating: (out of 6 reviews)

List Price: $ 44.99
Price: $ 21.95

Pro DNS and BIND Reviews

Review by J. P. Mens:

Ron Aitchison’s Pro DNS and BIND packs a whopping 550 pages of material which is easy to read for the novice or ongoing DNS administrator, and which is very well written (I greatly enjoyed the author’s style). After a short introduction in which I learnt some interesting facts about the provisioning of the root servers, the author implements a first zone describing the necessary concepts such as resource records, queries and zone transfers very clearly, followed by the different types of DNS setups (master, slave, caching, forwarding and stealth servers); these are covered in depth in chapter 7. Chapter five covers IPv6 and its relevance to BIND. Throughout the book, references to other DNS server implementations are given, but the primary focus is of course BIND 9.3.0.

Aitchison leads the reader through detailed installation of BIND on Linux, FreeBSD and even Windows (ISC has an installer for Windows in its portfolio), after which common DNS tasks are discussed (how to delegate a subdomain, how to define SPF records, etc. read it on-line here) as well as a chapter on tools.

The third part of the book is dedicated to securing DNS configurations with topics ranging from simple administrative issues (chroot jails) through securing DNS updates and zone transfers with TSIG and DNSSEC.bis which is covered very extensively in chapter 11.

Chapters 12 and 13 provide extensive commented references on BIND configuration and Zone files. There is of course plenty of on-line reference information on these two topics (including the author’s very good DNS for Rocket Scientists) but I like to have reference information on hardcopy (in the event my DNS servers fail, and I can’t reach the on-line documentation 🙂 )

In part 5 the author shortly covers programming with the BIND API and the resolver libraries, and he follows that with an interesting chapter on DNS Messages and Records, good to have if you want to sniff your way through DNS traffic.

The publisher’s web site carries a sample chapter as well as the source code to the book which is also available in TAR format on the author’s web site together with complementary information and pointers to further resources.

My only complaint about this otherwise excellent book is that on two or three occasions I read a paragraph that I thought I’d just read before; some duplication must have taken place (or I was tired). For the next edition, I’d like to read a chapter on interoperability between BIND and Microsoft Windows DNS servers, specifically regarding DNSSEC.

This book is an absolute must have for anybody who needs to understand DNS in the first place (irrespective of the implementation he or she plans to use), and it is a must have for a systems administrator who is either intending to deploy or has already deployed BIND 9.3. I wish I’d read this book before the first mentioned above.

Review by Harold McFarland:

The Domain Name System is a critical component of any large network or any computer connected to the Internet. While a home user would not need to setup a DNS server, business networks of any significant size would benefit from an internal server, DNS caching router or other components. This book takes the reader through a very good explanation of DNS and BIND, how it works, how to set it up, how to test it, and how to troubleshoot it. There are many books on DNS and BIND but most either assume a certain level of prior knowledge, provide theory without implementation information, or provide implementation information without any theory so you have no idea how to troubleshoot a problematic implementation. Author Ron Aitchison does an excellent job of discussing both theory and implementation in this book so you end up with a thorough education. He even covers the implementation of a secure DNS server. This book actually takes the reader from a level of complete novice through advanced DNS administrator and does an excellent job of it. Pro DNS and BIND is highly recommended and one of the better books on the subject available.

Buy Pro DNS and BIND now for only $ 21.95!

BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book

The BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book is a convenient resource covering the tools and configurations for the ISC BIND 9 DNS software suite. BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) is the most commonly-used DNS server on the Internet. BIND provides the named DNS server, a resolver library, and various tools for operating and verifying the DNS server and configurations. The BIND 9 implementation includes DNSSEC for signed zones, TSIG for signed DNS requests, IPv6 support, incremental zone transfers (IXFR), dynamic DNS, zone change notifications, EDNS0, multiple views, multi- processor support, and more. This printed book is based on a variety of open source documentation included with the BIND source code, including the definitive references for the configuration syntax and grammar and the usage of the BIND programs. New chapters and content were added, including many examples and detailed indexing and cross-referencing. This BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book corresponds to BIND 9.5 and also covers some differences between older versions.

Rating: (out of 1 reviews)

List Price: $ 20.90
Price: $ 18.81

BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book Reviews

Buy BIND 9 DNS Administration Reference Book now for only $ 18.81!

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Domain Names And DNS Book Reviews

Domain Names And DNS Book Reviews

Featured Domain Names and DNS:

Domain Name: Internet, Domain Name System, DNS root zone, Top-level domain, Generic top-level domain, . com, . net, . org, Country code top-level domain, … Hostname, Uniform Resource Locator

A domain name is an identification label that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority, or control in the Internet, based on the Domain Name System (DNS). Domain names are used in various networking contexts and application-specific naming and addressing purposes. They are organized in subordinate levels (subdomains) of the DNS root domain, which is nameless. The first-level set of domain names are the top-level domains (TLDs), including the generic top-level domains (gTLDs), such as the prominent domains com, net and org, and the country code top-level domains (ccTLDs). Below these top-level domains in the DNS hierarchy are the second-level and third-level domain names that are typically open for reservation by end-users that wish to connect local area networks to the Internet, run web sites, or create other publicly accessible Internet resources

Rating: (out of 1 reviews)

List Price: $ 71.00
Price: $ 67.45

Domain Name: Internet, Domain Name System, DNS root zone, Top-level domain, Generic top-level domain, . com, . net, . org, Country code top-level domain, … Hostname, Uniform Resource Locator Reviews

Buy Domain Name: Internet, Domain Name System, DNS root zone, Top-level domain, Generic top-level domain, . com, . net, . org, Country code top-level domain, … Hostname, Uniform Resource Locator now for only $ 67.45!

Domain Name System: Top-Level Domain, Icann, Jon Postel, Name Server, Mx Record, Dynamic Dns, Root Nameserver, Domain Name Registry

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher’s book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Top-Level Domain, Icann, Jon Postel, Name Server, Mx Record, Dynamic Dns, Root Nameserver, Domain Name Registry, Domain Name System Security Extensions, Internationalized Domain Name, Domain Name Speculation, Verisign, Zero Configuration Networking, Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, Domain Hack, Dns Zone Transfer, Opendns, Alternative Dns Root, List of Dns Record Types, Appliansys, Domain Name Registrar, Dns Hijacking, Domain Appraisal, Wildcard Dns Record, Dns Cache Poisoning, Dyndns, Punycode, Hosts File, Domain Tasting, Serial Number Arithmetic, Typosquatting, Site Finder, Hostname, Srv Record, Reverse Domain Hijacking, List of the Oldest Currently-Registered Internet Domain Names, Reverse Dns Lookup, Sleep Proxy Service, Tsig, At-Large Advisory Committee, Uniform Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy, Fast Flux, Type-In Traffic, Naptr Record, Domain Privacy, Internet Protocol Address Management, Teledotcom, Cname Record, Dns Root Zone, No-Ip, Getaddrinfo, Zone File, Toll Free Domain Name, Forward-Confirmed Reverse Dns, Single-Letter Second-Level Domain, Domain Parking, Extension Mechanisms for Dns, Domain Name Warehousing, Extensible Provisioning Protocol, Round Robin Dns, Registryasp, Independent Domain Registries, Distributed Denial of Service Attacks on Root Nameservers, Domain Name Auction, Dns Advantage, Mysqlbind, Fully Qualified Domain Name, Link-Local Multicast Name Resolution, Google Public Dns, Open Root Server Network, Geodomain, Subdomain, Phishtank, Name Service Switch, Domain Propagation, .Local, Vanity Domain, Arpa Host Name Server Protocol, Loc Record, Blackhole Server, Domain Name Front Running, Eurid, Example.com, Resolvconf, Geotld, Domains by Proxy, Domain Name Drop List, Everydns, Split-Horizon Dns, Snsd, Fic… More: http://booksllc.net/?id=8339

List Price: $ 14.14
Price: $ 14.14

DNS for Dummies

* Unique entry-level guide to Domain Name System (DNS), which translates Internet host names into IP addresses and is used with all Internet servers
* Shows how to install, configure, and troubleshoot DNS on both Windows and UNIX servers
* Helps people seeking technology certifications bone up on DNS theory, terminology, and architecture-a requirement in several popular exams
* Includes real-world examples based on the author’s daily experience with both large and small networks

Rating: (out of 4 reviews)

List Price: $ 24.99
Price: $ 9.20

DNS for Dummies Reviews

Review by W. Cruickshank:

This book pretty much unveiled the mysteries behind DNS. What used to seems like the science for only network engineers, now seem so easy to understand and practical.

If you are new to the world of networking, and want to do deeper, this book is a great launch pad.

Review by W. Fritz:

This is an excellent book for both beginners and those with some knowledge of DNS and how it works. It starts with the basics and includes how DNS relates to TCP/IP and the OSI model. It continues with setting up your DNS servers and troubleshooting. It continues on with more advanced concepts and security issues. All this is in a very readable format.

Buy DNS for Dummies now for only $ 9.20!

DNS & BIND Cookbook

The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. This title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, “How do I get BIND?” to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. With the wide range of recipes in this book, you’ll be able to Check whether a name is registeredRegister your domain name and name serversCreate zone files for your domainsProtect your name server from abuseSet up back-up mail servers and virtual email addressesDelegate subdomains and check delegationUse incremental transferSecure zone transfersRestrict which queries a server will answerUpgrade to BIND 9 from earlier versionPerform logging and troubleshootingUse IPv6 and much more.

Rating: (out of 7 reviews)

List Price: $ 34.95
Price: $ 34.94

DNS & BIND Cookbook Reviews

Review by :

This book has turned out to be the best investment I’ve made so far in my 20 year IT career. I’ve always trusted O’Reilly books for their detailed accuracy. However, for the task at hand, I didn’t need a book to explain WHY things work… I needed one to tell me how to GET them to work. This book was perfect! It doesn’t replace the DNS and BIND, 4th Edition, but is a great compliment… Actually, I’m finding the 4th Edition a perfect compliment to the Cookbook.

Review by Andrew P. Kaplan:

Like the BIND book, the DNS and BIND cookbook is an invaluable reference for any DNS/Email/Web admin. This book answers many of the questions raised in the BIND book through numerous illuminating illustrations. It explains the differences between BIND 4, 8 and 9. Plus there’s a great section on email and even IPv6The DNS & BIND cook book coupled with the BIND book are truly the BIND bibles.

Buy DNS & BIND Cookbook now for only $ 34.94!

Pro DNS and BIND

Pro DNS and BIND guides you through the challenging array of features surrounding DNS, with a special focus on BIND, the world’s most popular DNS implementation. This book unravels the mysteries of DNS, offering insight into origins, evolution, and key concepts like domain names and zone files. This book focuses on running DNS systems based on BIND 9.3.0—the first stable release that includes support for the latest DNSSEC (DNSSEC.bis) standards and a major functional upgrade from previous BIND 9 releases. If you administer a DNS system or are thinking about running one, or if you need to upgrade to support IPv6 DNS, need to secure a DNS for zone transfer, dynamic update, or other reasons, or if you need to implement DNSSEC, or simply want to understand the DNS system, then this book provides you with a single point of reference. Pro DNS and BIND starts with simple concepts, then moves on to full security-aware DNSSEC configurations. Various features, parameters, and resource records are described and, in the majority of cases, illustrated with one or more examples. The book contains a complete reference to zone files, Resource Records, and BIND’s configuration file parameters. You can treat the book as as a simple paint-by-numbers guide to everything from a simple caching DNS, to the most complex secure DNS (DNSSEC) implementation. Background information is still included for when you need to know what to do and why you have to do it, and so that you can modify processes to meet your unique needs. Topics Include: Introduction to the DNS Basic DNS types with complete configuarion examples DNS and IPv6 Installing BIND on Linux, FreeBSD and Windows Subdomain delegation DNS and load balancing

Rating: (out of 6 reviews)

List Price: $ 44.99
Price: $ 21.95

Pro DNS and BIND Reviews

Review by J. P. Mens:

Ron Aitchison’s Pro DNS and BIND packs a whopping 550 pages of material which is easy to read for the novice or ongoing DNS administrator, and which is very well written (I greatly enjoyed the author’s style). After a short introduction in which I learnt some interesting facts about the provisioning of the root servers, the author implements a first zone describing the necessary concepts such as resource records, queries and zone transfers very clearly, followed by the different types of DNS setups (master, slave, caching, forwarding and stealth servers); these are covered in depth in chapter 7. Chapter five covers IPv6 and its relevance to BIND. Throughout the book, references to other DNS server implementations are given, but the primary focus is of course BIND 9.3.0.

Aitchison leads the reader through detailed installation of BIND on Linux, FreeBSD and even Windows (ISC has an installer for Windows in its portfolio), after which common DNS tasks are discussed (how to delegate a subdomain, how to define SPF records, etc. read it on-line here) as well as a chapter on tools.

The third part of the book is dedicated to securing DNS configurations with topics ranging from simple administrative issues (chroot jails) through securing DNS updates and zone transfers with TSIG and DNSSEC.bis which is covered very extensively in chapter 11.

Chapters 12 and 13 provide extensive commented references on BIND configuration and Zone files. There is of course plenty of on-line reference information on these two topics (including the author’s very good DNS for Rocket Scientists) but I like to have reference information on hardcopy (in the event my DNS servers fail, and I can’t reach the on-line documentation 🙂 )

In part 5 the author shortly covers programming with the BIND API and the resolver libraries, and he follows that with an interesting chapter on DNS Messages and Records, good to have if you want to sniff your way through DNS traffic.

The publisher’s web site carries a sample chapter as well as the source code to the book which is also available in TAR format on the author’s web site together with complementary information and pointers to further resources.

My only complaint about this otherwise excellent book is that on two or three occasions I read a paragraph that I thought I’d just read before; some duplication must have taken place (or I was tired). For the next edition, I’d like to read a chapter on interoperability between BIND and Microsoft Windows DNS servers, specifically regarding DNSSEC.

This book is an absolute must have for anybody who needs to understand DNS in the first place (irrespective of the implementation he or she plans to use), and it is a must have for a systems administrator who is either intending to deploy or has already deployed BIND 9.3. I wish I’d read this book before the first mentioned above.

Review by Harold McFarland:

The Domain Name System is a critical component of any large network or any computer connected to the Internet. While a home user would not need to setup a DNS server, business networks of any significant size would benefit from an internal server, DNS caching router or other components. This book takes the reader through a very good explanation of DNS and BIND, how it works, how to set it up, how to test it, and how to troubleshoot it. There are many books on DNS and BIND but most either assume a certain level of prior knowledge, provide theory without implementation information, or provide implementation information without any theory so you have no idea how to troubleshoot a problematic implementation. Author Ron Aitchison does an excellent job of discussing both theory and implementation in this book so you end up with a thorough education. He even covers the implementation of a secure DNS server. This book actually takes the reader from a level of complete novice through advanced DNS administrator and does an excellent job of it. Pro DNS and BIND is highly recommended and one of the better books on the subject available.

Buy Pro DNS and BIND now for only $ 21.95!

The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND

The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND provides you with the technical depth and expert-level information you need to understand and administer DNS and BIND. Domain Name System (DNS) is a distributed Internet directory service. It is used mainly to translate between domain names and IP addresses, and to control Internet email delivery. Most Internet services rely on DNS to work, and if DNS fails, Web sites cannot be located and email delivery stalls. BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Daemon) is an implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols. This book covers setting up a DNS server and client, DNS domain zones, compiling and configuring BIND, dial-up connections, adding more domains, setting up root servers on private networks, firewall rules, Dynamic DNS (DDNS), subdomains and delegation, caching and name resolution, troubleshooting tools and techniques, debugging and logging, new features in BIND 8.2.2, and it offers introductory information on BIND 9.

Rating: (out of 6 reviews)

List Price: $ 34.99
Price: $ 12.79

The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND Reviews

Review by Ingvar Hagelund:

I found this book concice and clear, and much easier to understand than the classic “DNS and BIND” from O’Reilley. Specially, I found the fast steps onto a working DNS server clear and right to the point. I also enjoyed get a working secure dynamic DNS setup over a insecure network. Humor between the lines makes the book a good read. I’ll have this book in my front bookshelf for a long time. It’s great, both as a howto and for reference. Getting the BIND manpage printed on paper is a nice bonus as well. Mr. Langfeldt, you rule!Ingvar

Review by :

I liked this book. It covers interesting and relevant fields (DDNS, security concerns, how to interface with DNS from different languages, …) in addition to the basics, in enough depth to be really useful. It is practical and down-to-earth, with thorough examples, explaining how things work and why. It definitely helped me grok the ideas and concepts behind DNS.

Buy The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND now for only $ 12.79!

DNS on Windows 2000

DNS on Windows 2000 is a special Windows-oriented edition of the classic DNS and BIND. The Domain Name System (DNS) is one of the Internet’s fundamental building blocks: the distributed host information database that’s responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and many other services. As the preface says, if you’re using the Internet, you’re already using DNS– even if you don’t know it. Besides covering general issues like installing, setting up, and maintaining the server, DNS on Windows 2000 tackles those specific to the Windows environment: integration between DNS and Active Directory, conversion from BIND to the Microsoft DNS server, and registry settings. It pays special attention to security issues, system tuning, caching, zone change notification, troubleshooting, and planning for growth. Suitable for both Windows administrators who use DNS daily, and users who want to grasp how the Internet works.That Microsoft likes to implement network services in its own way–some would call this innovation; others would say it’s reinventing the wheel–is news to no one. The folks from Redmond have built Domain Name Service (DNS) capability into Windows 2000 Server, and sure enough, the implementation differs from all those that preceded it. There’s nothing wrong with it. It’s just unique, and DNS on Windows 2000 explains how. What’s more, the book explains DNS generally, in both global and organizational terms. For that reason, the authors are correct to point out in their introduction that this is essentially the classic DNS and BIND (which Cricket Liu, one of this book’s authors, also cowrote) for Windows 2000 instead of Unix. This book does a good job of tying together all aspects of DNS provision for a network administrator. It’s

Rating: (out of 3 reviews)

List Price: $ 39.95
Price: $ 5.52

DNS on Windows 2000 Reviews

Review by Dimitri Koens:

This is a great book! I already own DNS and BIND, but that book is specifically for BIND. As a technical consultant on Microsoft networks (…) I regularly deal with DNS. With this book I’m learning a great deal about the special Microsoft differences with the Internet standard of DNS.DNS isn’t easy. Especially in dial-up and e-mail configurations, you must implement certain settings. This book really answers those questions. There’s a whole chapter on configuring DNS for e-mail servers.Technical depth is quite good. Good enough for most environments anyway. This book will not answer every technical bit, but than you would need a 1500+ pages book. In all other circumstances: GET THIS BOOK! Readability is excellent, and this book will certainly last another 5 years.You will be vary satisfied with this book. I am.

Review by :

We needed to set up a Windows DNS server for our network, and all of my experience was with UNIX and BIND. This book has it all! What DNS is, how to plan your DNS structure, install a DNS server on Windows 2000, add forward/reverse zones, add additional DNS servers, and Active Directory integration!
I highly recomend this book to anyone who needs to set up a DNS server on a windows 2000 server!

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Why I believe 1 and 2 character domains should be allowed in .INFO

I posted this to the ICANN comments. If you feel strongly one way or another about 1-2 character domains being released in .INFO, I encourage you to comment as well. Here is a link to the information on how to participate (deadline March 20, 2010).

I have been pleased to see the trend of the relaxation of restrictions, at the second level, of 1 and 2 character domains.

Afilias’ proposal to allocate 1 and 2 character .info domains looks prudent and responsible. The use of RFP / Proposal and other careful allocation plans that they have identified seem smart and well thought. I believe they should be allowed to do this.

Additionally, these domains can add benefit to the community through their use and responsible allocation, as presented.

Here are three reasons to allow 1 and 2 character domains to be released:

1] Six other gTLDs have had these restrictions lifted and have since began allocation of the names.
The TLDs are .BIZ, .CAT, .COOP, .MOBI,. NAME, and .PRO. There is no reason that .INFO should not be treated equally, given the method with which they intend to responsibly allocate these names.

Actually it is 7 but the .JOBS request wasn’t something I counted.

Essentially, though, ICANN has previously approved requests from 7 other gTLD registries related to 1-2 character domain names:

2] Restriction of single character domains in gTLDs in general is a concept worth evolving from.

The act of restricting single characters is a dated concept that was put in place as a placeholder, so that these would be available to horizontally expand the namespace at one point and do registrations at the third level in the gTLDS.

This plan and action never practically occurred. I understand the conceived plan was to have registrations happen under a.com, b.com, j.net at the third level to help move past the need to add new TLDs as quickly. Though a good concept in principle, the plan came after some legacy allocations had already happened of single character domains in com, net, and org (CNO).

Attempting such horizonal expansion would not be possible in an elegant manner with a portion of the single character domains allocated in CNO. Clawing these back from registrants to attempt horizontal expansion of the namespace is something that would be
sharply unwise. And thus the plan stalled. And this was many years ago.

We since have 2 (and god willing soon more) rounds releasing new TLDs.

Between the premise of the restrictions and why they were made and the introduction of new TLDs, the restriction on single character SLD is no longer practically justified.

While I respect that there was good intentions and a smart idea behind the ‘why’ of reserving these at the first level such restrictions would be made, it seems a fair time to let go of this restriction now that over a decade has passed without the plan being re-visited, and there have been solutions to the ‘problem’ it was intended to solve that have rendered this restriction worth a revisit.

3] The 2 character limit seems to be in place for ccTLD / ISO 3166-1 list(s)

This is a concept that is wise at the root level. With a four character TLD, there is very little if any likelihood that .INFO, 2 character names whois be confused with a ccTLD. For example, it seems to me unlikely that ie.info would be mistaken for a .ie domain name.

With respect to 2 character restrictions, these seem to also be a legacy restriction that is worth revisiting to determine if it is appropriate in general in new TLDs, but given that Afilias has identified a fairly responsible manner of allocation, the restriction seems to be worth eliminating in .info.

I see no reason not to approve lifting the 1-2 character restrictions, and I encourage the board to allow the release of these names.